Yugoslavian architecture and public art at MOMA

New York’s Museum of Modern Art announced that a forthcoming exhibition, opening this summer, focuses on the architecture, urban planning and public art of Yugoslavia.

Edvard Ravnikar. Revolution Square (today Republic Square), Ljubljana, Slovenia. 1960–74. View of the Square. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2016
The exhitibion, titled ‘Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980’ opens on July 15, 2018 and will be on show till January 13, 2019.
‘Toward a Concrete Utopia explores themes of large-scale urbanization, technology in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture. The exhibition includes more than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region, and features work by important architects including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić. From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade, with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition examines the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character’ – reads the announcement.
The show is organized by Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, and Vladimir Kulić, guest curator, with Anna Kats, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.